Neural archaelogy

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garethnelsonuk
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Neural archaelogy

Post by garethnelsonuk » Mon Oct 20, 2014 7:30 pm

http://alcor.org/Library/html/NeuralArcheology.html

Reading through this i'm wondering what efforts have been directed to getting into this field in depth and what it would take to kick off the relevant research.

It seems that a setup like the following isn't too complex but would provide a lot of data:

1 - Take a bunch of lab rats
2 - Knock them out with anasthetic
3 - Surgically remove viable brain tissue and observe it under the electron microscope in automated windows of 5 minutes - take multiple samples and subject them to different stains to isolate particular compounds
4 - Repeat the above steps for simulated ischemic periods of longer intervals
5 - Repeat for various different forms of brain damage, including that caused by current cryopreservation methods

The important part here is to get a picture of the changes that occur to ischemic neurons over long time periods with the intention of building mathematical models that can figure out original positions, chemical compositions and so on given various types of damage.

The plus side is this work could have direct impact on more mainstream medical practice too.

So how do we go about getting it started? I'm serious - how do we actually get this work started? I'd personally be willing to donate whatever is affordable and promote the work, and I imagine the general public would be willing to donate if it can be shown that it'd have benefits to medical practice today and not just in the far future.

garethnelsonuk
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Re: Neural archaelogy

Post by garethnelsonuk » Fri Nov 07, 2014 5:52 pm

Just to bump this up again, i'm quite serious on this.

As a software geek who's dabbled in machine vision i'd be willing to take an active role in this kind of research in terms of developing mathematical models to figure out the original locations and topology of neurons but I have no means to get the raw data.

If anyone is aware of how to best approach getting raw data showing neural tissue at various stages of ischemia and with various types of freezing damage compared with the same tissue before such damage occurred then I think it'd be a good thing to start throwing some eyewire-style analysis at it.

See https://eyewire.org to find out what i'm talking about.

TDK
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Re: Neural archaelogy

Post by TDK » Fri Dec 05, 2014 8:35 pm

It seems like a legitimate piece of data/research to pursue.

I think the issue is probably that Alcor only wants to spend time and money researching things that can be immediately implemented, to improve cryopreservations. I don't think they are as interested (at this time) in the research pertaining to revival, because they know by the time weare trying to revive someone, there may be a bunch of newer technology that will make all that research much easier and cheaper. Perhaps computer modeling, or new kinds of scanners, etc. Right now, the core concern is on the best way to freeze, the best cryoprotectants, etc. Obviously, if Alcor eventually has unlimited research funds, they could look into stuff like that, just to expand the knowledge base.

One of the phrases they used in some seminars, etc, is: "Last in, first out".

Meaning the people of the future, will eventually have a method of freezing with no damage at all, and the ability to un-freeze them, restart their hearts, and they can go about their business. Regardless if that is used for surgery, space travel, or other purposes. So the idea is that some of the last people frozen by Alcor, will have some of the best cryoprotectants, and the best ways to unfreeze them. So it probably won't be terribly difficult. The people frozen without cryoprotectants, or the ones with toxic cryoprotectants, will be harder to repair and unfreeze. So the idea is that you will be tackling that problem decades in the future. So the tools at your disposal will be much more powerful. So why waste time and effort on researching that problem now, when there are other issues that could be much more beneficial. Such as that magnetic freezing technology. Things like that are very promising. I'd love to see a switchover to a method like that, in my lifetime, so I can be frozen without cryoprotectant.

RibJig
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Re: Neural archaelogy

Post by RibJig » Thu Nov 19, 2015 4:40 pm

> if Alcor eventually has unlimited research funds

How is that going to happen???

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