wiki Alcor, I just edited first paragraph

General forum for any topics not covered by the other forums
Post Reply
RibJig
Posts: 70
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:02 pm
Relationship with Alcor: Member

wiki Alcor, I just edited first paragraph

Post by RibJig » Fri Jan 31, 2020 9:08 pm

It originally read:

The Alcor Life Extension Foundation, most often referred to as Alcor, is an American nonprofit organization based in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. Alcor advocates for, researches, and performs cryonics, the freezing of human corpses and brains in liquid nitrogen after legal death, with hopes of resurrecting and restoring them to full health in the unlikely event some new technology can be developed in the future.[1] Cryonics is a pseudoscience.[2] It is regarded with skepticism by some within the mainstream scientific community and has been characterized as quackery.[3]

I deleted "unlikely" as IMO it is 50/50 or better...?
I added "by some" as there are scientists who support cryonics...
My evidence is continuing scientific advancement.
Any other supporting evidence?
Any other obvious errors that need correcting in this wiki paragraph?
Although alcor don't, IMO members can be proactive about cryonics,
possibly increasing interest & triggering explorations-discoveries, etc.

Frosty
Posts: 48
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 7:42 pm
Relationship with Alcor: Member

Re: wiki Alcor, I just edited first paragraph

Post by Frosty » Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:41 pm

Hi RibJig,

I agree with you on removing the word 'unlikely' from the lede, unless that word was added by someone who has personal knowledge of the future. It would be most accurate to call the revival of cryonics patients an event of unknown likelihood, but since that is a bit wordy, dropping 'unlikely' works just fine. However, I believe it is entirely accurate to say the vast majority of mainstream scientists who are aware of cryonics consider it to be quackery, and that shouldn't be all that surprising or insulting to us. Wikipedia is intended to provide a summary of mainstream scientific opinion, so describing cryonics as a pseudoscience and quackery is exactly what it should say. One of the core assumptions that the cryonics movement rests on is that the mainstream scientific community is wrong about the feasibility of cryonics revival because these scientists have (since their early childhood) been taught a very narrow definition of death viewed exclusively through the lens of natural biology. The concept of information-theoretic death is completely foreign to these people and the science surrounding it has yet to be properly developed, so one could very effectively argue that at present, the mainstream scientific community is no more qualified to speak on this subject than any given armchair researcher/philosopher such as you or myself. A disciplined scientist would refrain from making any definitive judgments for or against cryonics under these circumstances (considering these same people don't even know how a brain works, let alone how to build one), but most seem unable to do so. Cryonics makes claims that simply cannot be proven or dis-proven with today's science and technology, and thus can properly be labelled as a pseudoscience. Someday, these claims will be put to the test and found either to be valid or invalid, but that hasn't happened yet. Until then, it cannot be classified as a science or a medical procedure and shouldn't be treated as such. It is a proposition and an experiment based on the laws of physics and extrapolations of current technology for which the final results may not be known for centuries. And from a personal perspective, it is a bet in favor of humanity's ultimate triumph over death by technological means as opposed to an alternative scenario in which (for some unspecified or highly contrived reason) this never occurs, despite the fact our species - having conquered the planet and nearby space - now plausibly has billions of years to work on this problem and solve it.



Frosty

RibJig
Posts: 70
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:02 pm
Relationship with Alcor: Member

Re: wiki Alcor, I just edited first paragraph

Post by RibJig » Tue Feb 04, 2020 11:04 am

Frosty & all,

Thanks for response & details.

Someone came in after me & did further editing.
They didn't re-add "unlikely" & moved "pseudoscience".
I think its more accurate than before my edit:

The Alcor Life Extension Foundation, most often referred to as Alcor, is an American nonprofit organization based in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. Alcor advocates for, researches, and performs cryonics, the freezing of human corpses and brains in liquid nitrogen after legal death, with hopes of resurrecting and restoring them to full health in the event some new technology can be developed in the future.[1] Cryonics is regarded with skepticism within the mainstream scientific community and has been characterized as quackery and pseudoscience.[2][3]

As to the history of pseudoscience, are there many examples of pseudosciences
becoming science, especially since, say, 1900AD, & involve biology? Are there any at
a lofty-enough level to support hope for cryonics undergoing conversion to science
Organ transplants? Other :?: :?: :?:
(good topic, IMO, for Alcor quarterly magazine...)

Post Reply